Category Archives: Uncategorized

Coming soon: Anna Freeman Bentley – make believe

84pp, hardback, 240 x 260 mm, c.50 images

Anna Freeman Bentley’s paintings use architectural imagery to explore the emotive potential of space and its associations with longing. Grounded in an interest in the baroque her source material includes junk shops, restaurants, private members clubs, flea markets and designed interiors. Central to her work is an investigation into surface, tension and the atmosphere evoked by these different interior surroundings. The spaces she depicts are empty, yet visual signifiers point to evidence of people and social happenings.

This, Freeman Bentley’s third publication to date, is centred on the relationship between painting and cinema and is divided into sections dedicated to major paintings on canvas and panel, and a number of works on paper (all works 2021–22). Freeman Bentley’s work here is focused on sets from ‘The Colour Room’ (2021), a film that tells the story of the early career of celebrated British ceramicist Clarice Cliff (1899–1972). Many of the titles of the paintings are taken from lines of the film’s script.

The foreword to the book is written by Rollo Campbell and Matt Incledon of Frestonian Gallery. An essay by writer and critic Thomas Marks draws out the importance to her work of historic and contemporary cinema and temporary architecture. Marks notes a change in palette in these new paintings, with Freeman Bentley embracing pastels and tracing parallels between the artist herself and Cliff. Marks’ essay discusses what he terms the ‘overlapping realities that the film set presents’, highlighting examples of anomalies on set (a cable or air purifier) that Freeman Bentley captures within her work. An interview with Georgie Paget, co-founder of Caspian Films, production company for ‘The Colour Room’, meanwhile, provides insight into the artist’s particular interest in the artifice of film props and of the film set as a layered space ‘steeped in meaning, purpose and potential.’ The two discuss the reciprocity of painting and cinema in detail, recounting Freeman Bentley’s experiences on the film’s sets and discussing her working processes, beginning with taking photographs on set, through to oil sketches and the later development of large-scale canvases.

The publication is edited by Matt Incledon and Matt Price. It is designed by Joe Gilmore, printed and bound by Gomer, Wales, and co-published by Frestonian Gallery, London, and Anomie Publishing, London. The publication coincides with the second solo show by Anna Freeman Bentley at Frestonian Gallery, by whom the artist is represented. The exhibition, also titled ‘make believe’ is divided between two sites: the 2022 Armory Show, New York, and Frestonian Gallery, London.

Anna Freeman Bentley studied Painting at Chelsea College of Art, Kunsthochschule Berlin Weissensee and the Royal College of Art. Awards and residencies include Palazzo Monti Residency, Brescia, Italy, 2019; The Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation Grant 2019 and 2017, and Artist in Restaurant residency at Michelin-starred restaurant Pied à Terre, London, 2012. Selected exhibitions (* denotes solo) include DENK Gallery, Los Angeles, 2019*, Ahmanson Gallery, Irvine, 2018*; Space K, Seoul, 2017; 68projects, Berlin, 2017; the East London Painting Prize 2014 and 2015; Workshop Gallery, Venice, 2012*; MAC Birmingham, 2011; Prague Biennale, 2011, and the Bloomberg New Contemporaries, 2009. Her work is part of the Hotel Crillon collection, Paris; Saatchi Collection, London; Hogan Lovells Collection, London; the Ahmanson Collection, California, and numerous private collections worldwide.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-43-3
RRP: £25 / €30 / $33
UK release date: 22 September 2022
US release date: 20 October 2022
Texts by Thomas Marks and Georgie Paget
Foreword by Rollo Campbell and Matt Incledon
Edited by Matt Incledon and Matt Price
Designed by Joe Gilmore, Qubik

Co-published by Frestonian Gallery, London, and Anomie Publishing, London

Images © Anna Freeman Bentley, 2022. Courtesy the artist and Frestonian Gallery, London.
Photography by Anna Arca and Peter Mallet

Coming soon: Lorna Robertson – thoughts, meals, days

160pp, hardback, 260 x 210 mm, c.100 images

Lorna Robertson’s colourful paintings, often made with a combination of oil paint and collage, have a distinctly nostalgic tone. Shimmering female forms with swinging skirts from the 1950s or bonneted bathers from the 1920s jostle with richly described interiors and crowded tabletops. Hints and glimpses of tangible forms – a fashion model, for example, or a vase – appear and then fragment into patterns and explosions of colour. ‘My paintings,’ Robertson says, ‘sit somewhere between abstraction and figuration, a tangled game of hide-and-seek that plays with the visibility and readability of an image. I often paint to find out what to paint, creating harmonies and tensions through placement of shape, specificity of colour – the process itself becoming an act of revealing.’

This new publication coincides with Robertson’s exhibition at Ingleby Gallery and is divided into sections that feature collections of recent large paintings by the artist (2015–2022), small paintings (all 2022) and works on paper (2016–2022), all of which demonstrate Robertson’s characteristic layered interpretations of the female form alongside recurring motifs such as hats, long dresses and flowers. Her drawings (2018–2020) offer fluid forms in ink, pencil and watercolour. These reproductions are accompanied by photographs of Robertson’s busy studio walls and painting tools which provide an intimate picture of her working environment and processes.

An essay by art critic Hettie Judah explores Robertson’s work in terms of pattern, costume and architecture, drawing out key inspirations including tapestry, advertising and magazine design through abstracted forms. The influence of contemporary female painters and those from art history is further considered. Robertson’s paintings ‘are often composed like sound works, punctuated by returning motifs, balanced between harmony and discord, built up in many layers of different elements.’ But, warns Judah, ‘Don’t be fooled by the cool abstraction, there’s feeling here too – memory floods in waves of colour and rhythm through these.’

In a second text, Robertson is in conversation with artist and writer Mikey Cuddihy. This frank interview reveals much about Robertson’s intuitive working processes: from starting points, colour decisions, the rhythms of brushwork and considerations of scale, to the wider relationship between text, music, drawing and painting.

The publication is edited by Ingleby Gallery, designed by Joanna Deans, Identity, printed by Albe De Coker, and co-published by Ingleby, Edinburgh, and Anomie, London. The publication coincides with Robertson’s first solo exhibition ‘thoughts, meals, days’ at Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh, in 2022. The artist is represented by Ingleby Gallery.

Lorna Robertson was born in Ayr on the west coast of Scotland in 1967. She studied at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee and currently lives and works in Glasgow. Recent public solo exhibitions of work by Robertson include Kodachroma, Glasgow Project Room (2013); This Dark Ceiling, Intermedia Gallery, C.C.A, Glasgow (2008); The Overlooked, Atelier Am Eck, Dusseldorf, Germany (2006) and New Paintings, 64 Osborne Street, Glasgow (2005). Robertson’s group exhibition credits include Once Upon a Time, Flora Fairbairn, The Portman Estate, London (2022); Faces in the Water, Ingleby at Cromwell Place, South Kensington, London (2021); Brexit: Mail Art from a Small Island, Sipgate Shows, Düsseldorf, Germany (2019); Lorna Robertson and Robert MacBryde, Kingsgate Project Space, London (2019); Psychopathology of Everyday life, Glasgow Project Room (2011); and Vistas, Glasgow Project Room (2003). The artist was awarded the John Kinross Traveling Scholarship to Florence in 1990 and the Summer Scholarship, Hospitalfield School of Art, Arbroath, Scotland in 1989.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-42-6
RRP: £28 / €33 / $35
UK release date: 8 September 2022
US release date: 6 October 2022
Texts by Hettie Judah and Mikey Cuddihy
Edited by Ingleby, Edinburgh
Designed by Jo Deans, Identity

Co-published by Ingleby, Edinburgh, and Anomie Publishing, London

Images © Lorna Robertson, 2022. Courtesy the artist and Ingleby, Edinburgh.
Photography by John McKenzie

Anomie’s Summer 2022 brochure now available to view and to download

Anomie_Summer_2022_brochure_1_LR.jpg

Anomie Publishing’s Summer 2022 brochure is now available to view online and to download, featuring recent and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. On the cover this season is Alt-Concreto 13, 2017, one of the ongoing series of sculptures by Dundee-born, London-based artist David Batchelor started in 2011 combining concrete with a variety of brightly coloured – and often found – materials. The release of the publication coincides with the first major survey exhibition of Batchelor’s work, Colour Is, which is on show at Compton Verney in Warwickshire until 2 October 2022.

Also featured is Dorset-based painter Ian McKeever’s publication Henge Paintings, devoted to a series of paintings inspired by prehistoric standing stones in the county of Wiltshire, UK. Comprising thirty paintings along with numerous works on paper, the series continues the artist’s long-standing investigation into abstract painting. Henge Paintings is published by Anomie, London, with support from Galleri Susanne Ottesen, Copenhagen, and Heather Gaudio Fine Art, New Canaan, Connecticut. The publication accompanies exhibitions of selected works from the Henge paintings at both galleries in 2022.

Anomie’s recent titles Manolo Valdés – In Glass and Sarah Medway – The River Series are now available and shipping from both the UK and USA distribution warehouses, along with reprints of Jadé Fadojutimi – Jesture and Daphne Oram – An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics, so there’s plenty of great art and good reading this summer with Anomie.

To view and to download a copy of the Anomie Summer 2022 brochure, please click on the image above.

Now available: David Batchelor – Concretos

144pp, softback, 265 x 215 mm, c.100 images

Throughout his international career spanning more than thirty years, artist and writer David Batchelor has long been preoccupied with colour. ‘Colour is not just a feature of [my] sculpture or painting,’ he notes,‘but its central and overriding subject.’ This new publication is devoted to an ongoing series of sculptures titled Concretos. First made in 2011, Concretos combine concrete with a variety of brightly coloured – and often found – materials.

The publication features a text by Batchelor charting the development of Concretos, revealing that the first Concreto was made after encountering coloured glass shards embedded in a concrete wall in the back streets of Palermo. Over time these Concretos, their title a nod to the Latin American art movement to which Batchelor’s work is much indebted, have become more complex adventures in layering, pattern and process. Elements such as acrylic plastic, spray and household gloss paint, steel, fabric and found objects all find themselves set in a concrete base.

In an essay commissioned for the publication, curator Eleanor Nairne considers Concretos in light of their material possibilities. Nairne’s vivid text draws connections between the sculptures and a wide range of art historical and literary references. Some of the playful and sensual characteristics of Batchelor’s artistic vocabulary are considered in relation to floral bouquets, sewing-machines, ice cream and poetry.

Architectural historian Adrian Forty’s essay discusses concrete’s relationship with modernity. He notes that the imperfect nature and apparent neutrality of the material is key to its enduring place within architecture, design and in Batchelor’s case, contemporary sculpture. ‘In the Concretos,’ asserts Forty, ‘concrete plays a necessary part in allowing colour to be itself. Present, but at the same time part of the barely noticed, half-invisible infrastructure of the city, concrete’s very neutrality performs an unexpectedly active part in these works.’

The publication coincides with the first large-scale survey exhibition of Batchelor’s work taking place at Compton Verney, Warwickshire in 2022. The publication has been supported by Goldsmiths’ College, University of London, and Arts Council England.

David Batchelor was born in Dundee in 1955 and lives in London. In 2013, a major solo exhibition of Batchelor’s two-dimensional work, Flatlands, was displayed at Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh and toured to Spike Island, Bristol. The solo exhibition My Own Private Bauhaus was presented by Ingleby Gallery during the Edinburgh Art Festival, 2019. Between 2017 and 2020 a large-scale work was displayed at Tate Modern. He is represented by Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh, and Galeria Leme, São Paulo. Batchelor’s portfolio also features major temporary and permanent artworks in the public realm including Sixty Minute Spectrum – a chromatic clock installed in the roof of the Hayward Gallery, London.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-38-9
RRP: £20 / €23,50 / $25
UK release date: 28 July 2022
US release date: 1 September 2022
Texts by David Batchelor, Adrian Forty and Eleanor Nairne
Edited by David Batchelor and Matt Price
Designed by Hyperkit, London

Published by Anomie Publishing, London

Images © David Batchelor 2022. Courtesy the artist.
Photography by Lucy Dawkins, Tom Nolan and Angus Mill.

Reprint now available: Jadé Fadojutimi – Jesture

76pp, softback, 280 x 240 mm, c.30 images

Jadé Fadojutimi’s sell-out publication ‘Jesture’ has been reprinted and is now available. The title was produced by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery to accompany the second solo exhibition at the gallery of new paintings by London-based artist Jadé Fadojutimi, presented in autumn 2020. Described by Fadojutimi as ‘environments’, these complex compositions, neither wholly abstract nor figurative, are built up with layers of oil paint, interrupted by the more linear mark-making made possible by her recent adoption of oil pastels. The introduction of new materials into her painting has enabled Fadojutimi to think more broadly about palette, composition and depth, while translating the spontaneity of her drawing onto the canvas.

In her essay for the publication, ‘From Life – Thoughts on the paintings of Jadé Fadojutimi’, writer and editor-at-large of frieze magazine Jennifer Higgie writes: ‘In these paintings, the world, in all of its chaotic glory, exists as an intimation. Art is not an explanation: it’s a shot of energy, a flash of colour; a shimmer, a reaction, a line thrown out to see who might pick it up. Pictures are made by people and, like people, their tone can switch direction in the blink of an eye.’

This, the artist’s first published book, designed by A Practice for Everyday Life, has been co-published by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London, and Anomie Publishing, London. It was first published in January 2021 and reprinted in 2022.

Jadé Fadojutimi (b.1993) lives and works in London. She earned a BA from The Slade School of Fine Art, London, in 2015 and an MA from the Royal College of Art, London, in 2017. After Pippy Houldsworth Gallery took on representation of the artist and presented her first solo exhibition in 2017-18, she had her first one-person institutional show at PEER UK, London in 2019. Acquisitions by Baltimore Museum of Art, ICA Miami, Tate London and a promised gift to Dallas Museum of Art followed soon after. She had her first solo exhibition in Germany with Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, in 2019 and will have her first solo exhibition in Japan with Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, opening March 2021. Fadojutimi has been selected to participate in Liverpool Biennial 2021. Her first solo US museum exhibition was presented at ICA Miami in November 2021. She will have a solo exhibition of new work at The Hepworth Wakefield in autumn 2022 and has been selected for inclusion in the international pavilion of the Venice Biennale, from April to November 2022.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-29-7
RRP: £30 / €35 / $40
First published in January 2021
UK reprint release date: 12 May 2022
US reprint release date: 26 May 2022
Produced by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London
Designed by A Practice for Everyday Life

Co-published by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery and Anomie Publishing, London

Images © Jadé Fadojutimi 2020. Courtesy the artist and Pippy Houldsworth Gallery.
Photography by Mark Blower, Eva Herzog, and Todd White Art Photography.

Now available: Ian McKeever – Henge Paintings

96pp, softback, 285 x 244 mm, c.43 images

A substantial series of abstract works inspired by the neolithic standing stones in Avebury, Wiltshire, UK

With a career spanning more than five decades, Ian McKeever is one of Britain’s most senior artists working on the international stage. This, his latest publication, documents the Henge paintings – a series started in 2017 and completed over five years, inspired by prehistoric standing stones in the county of Wiltshire, UK, and continuing the artist’s long-standing investigation into abstract painting.

Comprising thirty paintings along with numerous works on paper, the genesis of the series was a visit by McKeever to the world-famous neolithic site in the village of Avebury in 2016, where he took black and white photographs of the large stones that form three discrete circles. Art historian and curator Paul Moorhouse, in his essay for the publication, describes how McKeever ‘framed each megalith in close-up, their edges visible at the extremity of the resulting images,’ explaining how ‘the experience of moving around Avebury and responding to the huge stones’ monumental presence made an abiding impression that resonated with deep-seated preoccupations.’ McKeever’s resulting body of work is an earnest and considered exploration into how paint can convey universal forces and properties such as mass, gravity and time, and how colour, texture and abstraction can converse with three-dimensional space, form and materiality. The relationship between painting and sculpture in McKeever’s work is discussed further in a conversation between the artist and Dr Jon Wood.

Ian McKeever – Henge Paintings is published by Anomie, London, with support from Galleri Susanne Ottesen, Copenhagen, and Heather Gaudio Fine Art, New Canaan, Connecticut. The publication accompanies exhibitions of selected works from the Henge paintings at both galleries in 2022.

Ian McKeever was born 1946, Withernsea, Yorkshire, UK. He lives and works in Hartgrove, Dorset. Recent public solo exhibitions include Ian McKeever / Tony Cragg – Painting and Sculpture, Skulpturenpark Waldfrieden, Wuppertal, Germany (2020); Paintings 1992–2018, Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, UK (2018); Hours of Darkness, Hours of Light, Kunstmuseet i Tønder, Denmark (2015); Between Darkness and Light, National Gallery of the Faroe Islands, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (2015); Hours of Darkness, Hours of Light, Kunst-Station Sankt Peter Köln, Cologne, Germany (2014); and Hartgrove. Malerei und Fotografie, Josef Albers Museum, Bottrop, Germany (2012).

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-41-9
RRP: £25 / €30 / $33
UK release date: 14 July 2022
US release date: 18 August 2022
Texts by Ian McKeever, Paul Moorhouse and Jon Wood
Designed and produced by Tim Harvey

Published by Anomie Publishing, London

Images courtesy of the artist.
Painting documentation photography by Jonathan Bassett
© Copyright DACS / Ian McKeever

Anomie’s Spring 2022 brochure now available to view and to download

Anomie_Spring_2022_brochure_cover-1

Anomie Publishing’s Spring 2022 brochure is now available to view online and to download, featuring recent and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. On the cover this season is Cabeza de Cristal III, 2021, one of the remarkable glass sculptural busts featured in the latest title from Manolo Valdés, one of the most significant post-war Spanish artists. A key member of the Equipo Crónica until 1981, in 1989 he moved to New York. Major solo exhibitions include at the Guggenheim Bilbao, the Reina Sofía, Madrid, the New York Botanical Garden, and the Château Royale de Chambord, France.

Also featured is London-based painter Sarah Medway’s second publication from Anomie Publishing, which is devoted to the subject of the River Thames. The publication presents a series of twenty-eight oil paintings created in Medway’s canal-side studio in central London during the Covid-19 lockdowns of 2020-21. As well as group exhibitions at institutions such as Tate Britain, the Whitechapel, the Royal Academy, the World Trade Center and Austin Museum of Art, Medway’s solo shows include Flowers East, London, Chelsea Hotel, New York, Kienbaum Gallery, Frankfurt, The Mandalai, Thailand, and Atelier Gallery, Spain.

Anomie is delighted to announce that following the sell-out success of Jadé Fadojutimi’s first trade release, Jesture, co-published by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery and Anomie Publishing in January 2021, the publication is being reprinted and will be available again in spring 2022. Fadojutimi has been selected for inclusion in the International Pavilion at this year’s edition of the Venice Biennale.

Also reprinted this season is Daphne Oram – An Individual Note, co-published by the Daphne Oram Trust and Anomie Academic. Supported by a Kickstarter campaign and the Daphne Oram Trust, this new edition of Oram’s seminal 1971 publication was published in 2016 and is now in its third reprint.

To view and to download a copy of the Anomie Spring 2022 brochure, please click on the image above.

Now available: Manolo Valdés – In Glass

112pp, Hardback with dust jacket, 340 x 270 mm, c.65 images

A large-format publication documenting a new series of glass sculptures by one of Spain’s most senior artists.

For over half a century, Valencia-born, New York-based Manolo Valdés has been a prominent figure in the arena of international contemporary art. In this imposing publication, Valdés presents a body of thirty-five sculptures created in 2020 and 2021. The primary medium employed is glass, following an intense period of research and experimentation. The resulting works are contemporary portrait busts that make reference to the history of modernist art.

Valdés has created these sculptural glass busts in a range of amber oranges, ruby reds, emerald greens, sapphire blues, and onyx blacks, all of which almost seem to glow with what Dr Kosme de Barañano, the book’s author, describes as ‘an inner light’. Barañano’s illuminating essay not only investigates aspects of the history of glass making and its use as a material by artists past and present, but also traces the evolution of the language and forms of Valdés’s works across a number of key exhibitions and bodies of work over the course of the past two decades.These include his monumental sculptures at the New York Botanical Garden in 2012 and his dramatic solo presentation in the Place Vendôme in Paris in 2016, both of which offered opportunities to see the artist’s large-scale sculptural works in outdoor settings.

The qualities of the surfaces of the abstracted, humanlike glass heads are enhanced by the curious and eclectic appendages that regularly appear to burst forth from them like unorthodox fascinators or eccentric jewellery, from nails and steel rods to glass or metal butterflies and wooden geometric forms. With a timelessness that speaks of civilisations long gone and a modernity that simultaneously looks to the future, Valdés has created a body of sculpture in glass that transcends time, touching on the metaphysical nature of the human mind and its outward manifestation in the physical world.

Manolo Valdés (b.1942, Valencia) is one of the most significant post-war Spanish artists. A key member of the Equipo Crónica until 1981, in 1989 he moved to New York. Major solo exhibitions include at the Guggenheim Bilbao, the Reina Sofía, Madrid, the New York Botanical Garden, and the Château Royale de Chambord, France.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-37-2
RRP: £35 / €42 / $47
UK release date: 12 May 2022
US release date: 16 June 2022
By Kosme de Barañano
Designed and produced by Peter B. Willberg

Published by Anomie Publishing, London

Images courtesy of the artist.
Artwork photography by Tom Powel Imaging.

Now available: Sarah Medway – The River Series

88pp, cloth-bound hardback, 260 x 245 mm, c.58 images

A significant new body of abstract paintings by British painter Sarah Medway, inspired by the River Thames.

This, London-based painter Sarah Medway’s second publication from Anomie Publishing, is devoted to the subject of the River Thames. The publication presents a series of twenty-eight oil paintings created in Medway’s canal-side studio in central London during the Covid-19 lockdowns of 2020-21.

An introductory text by critic and writer Sue Hubbard takes readers through the series, exploring how the paintings engage with the qualities of the river to represent all manner of concepts, experiences and emotions, from a yearning for lost freedoms to roam the city during the pandemic to evocations of the subterranean waterways that form part of the city’s mythology. Like a flâneuse, Medway follows the river across the city, spanning the seasons, in various weather, light and atmospheric conditions, at different times.

The Thames is beautiful, terrifying, powerful, alluring and dangerous. Medway captures the river’s eclectic dynamics, rhythms and energy through the language of abstract painting, the ripples, bubbles, eddies and currents, the reflections and refractions denoted through sinuous lines, ellipses and spots, dots and loops, flecks and swirls. Referencing twentieth-century modernist movements such as De Stijl, Tachisme and post-war American Abstract Expressionism, Medway’s own, lyrical, often graphic approach to painting the Thames results in a vivid interplay between pattern and colour. The paintings have overt musical resonances – tempo, rhythm and dynamics as might be encountered in an orchestral score. Like the river, the paintings are at times joyous and playful, at other times brooding and menacing, yet always moving, in flux, traveling onwards towards the sea.

An in-conversation between Medway and writer, editor and curator Anna McNay provides insight into the artist’s life and work, discussing the processes by which Medway makes her paintings and the thinking behind them. Speaking to McNay, Medway asserts: ‘Water has always flooded the abstract language in my work. Not just the sea, but lakes, ponds, canals, dykes and rivers. The myriad and multiple reflections on water, during daylight or at night, have always been present in my paintings’. Designed and produced by Peter B. Willberg, this foil-blocked, cloth-bound hardback publication with a special dustjacket also features an illustrated chronology documenting Medway’s life and career.

Sarah Medway (b.1955, Seaton Carew, UK) is a painter based in London. As well as group exhibitions at institutions such as Tate Britain, the Whitechapel, the Royal Academy, the World Trade Center and Austin Museum of Art, Medway’s solo shows include Flowers East, London, Chelsea Hotel, New York, Kienbaum Gallery, Frankfurt, The Mandalai, Thailand, and Atelier Gallery, Spain. She has works in many public, private and corporate collections in the UK, US, Germany, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Hong Kong and Thailand.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-30-3
RRP: £28 / €33 / $38
UK release date: 28 April 2022
US release date: 2 June 2022
Texts by Sue Hubbard, Anna McNay and Sarah Medway
Designed and produced by Peter B. Willberg

Published by Anomie Publishing, London

Images courtesy of the artist.
Artwork photography by James Tye.

Now available: Journey of the Mind

144pp, cloth-bound hardback, 220 x 220 mm, c.40 images

A publication and touring exhibition to share the teachings of Sikhism through artworks and stories.

‘Journey of the Mind’ is the first publication from Without Shape Without Form (WSWF), an arts organisation and arts space established in 2017 by volunteers from the Guru Maneyo Granth Gurdwara (GMGG) in Slough, England. WSWF is the UK’s first, and currently only, permanent Sikh art gallery.

The publication has been created as an illustrated introduction to the history, stories and teachings of Sikhism. The Gurus – the teachers of the Sikh faith – shared a message of kindness, equality and inclusivity, helping all humanity find peace in troubled times and connect with truth through the journey of the mind.

The mission of the Gurus was supported by brave and inspiring warriors who, following the teaching of the Gurus, devoted their minds to Waheguru (the Creator) and found peace in the face of adversity. The last Guru, Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, is not a person, but a collection of texts embodying the teachings of Sikhism, accessible to everyone, for all time. ‘Journey of the Mind’ shares the wisdom of these texts, including excerpts in the original Gurmukhi, Punjabi.

Artworks by world-renowned Sikh artist Kanwar Singh illustrate the stories. In today’s frenetic, turbulent world, the message of the Gurus is more relevant than ever – we have everything we need within us to achieve peace. It is the ambition and hope of WSWF that people will be inspired by these words to embark on their own journey of the mind.

‘Journey of the Mind’ is a publication and travelling exhibition by Without Shape Without Form. The book has been designed and produced by Herman Lelie. It is co-published by Without Shape Without Form and Anomie Special Projects, London, and is being launched to coincide with the start of the exhibition tour at Library of Birmingham in November 2021.

 

ISBN: 978-1-910221-35-8
RRP: £30 / €35 / $40
UK release date: 2 December 2021
US release date: 16 December 2021
Text by Koi
Artwork by Kanwar Singh
Developed by GMGG, Slough
Designed and produced by Herman Lelie and Stefania Bonelli

Co-published by Without Shape Without Form, Slough, and Anomie Special Projects, London

Images courtesy of the artist.
Installation photography by Peter Mallet.