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Coming soon: The Anomie Review of Contemporary British Painting

The paintings of 40 contemporary artists from Britain discussed through 40 national and
international solo exhibitions
160pp, softback, 280 x 210 mm, c. 180 images

‘The Anomie Review of Contemporary British Painting’ considers and celebrates the work of forty artists whose practices have been defining Britain’s contribution to current painting on the national and international stage. The anthology documents forty solo exhibitions in public museums and galleries, as well as in commercial, independent and artist-led spaces, both in Britain and abroad, during 2017. In addition to illustrating around 150 paintings, the publication features installation views from many of these exhibitions.

Featured artists and exhibitions include: Tom Anholt at Mikael Andersen, Copenhagen; Gillian Carnegie at Cabinet, London; Andrew Cranston at Wilkinson, London; Kaye Donachie at Le Plateau, Frac Ile-de-France, Paris; Nick Goss at Josh Lilley, London; Lubaina Himid at Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe; Ryan Mosley at Eigen + Art, Leipzig; Chris Ofili at Victoria Miro Venice; George Shaw at Maruani Mercier, Brussels; Raqib Shaw at The Whitworth, Manchester; Clare Woods at DCA, Dundee; and Rose Wylie at Serpentine Galleries, London. Read more

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Anomie’s spring/summer 2018 brochure now available

Anomie Publishing’s spring/summer 2018 brochure is now out, featuring recent, new and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. One highlight is a new publication of extraordinary paintings of dead and dying flowers by British artist Justin Mortimer, entitled ‘Hoax’ and published to coincide with a solo presentation by the artist at The Armory Show in New York in spring 2018, with Parafin gallery, London. Another highlight is a publication of paintings by British artist Anna Freeman Bentley, exploring the subject of private members clubs, primarily in Los Angeles, which has been co-published by Anomie and Pinatubo Press to coincide with an exhibition of the works at The Ahmanson Gallery, Irvine, California. The success of Anomie’s recent edition of British electronic music pioneer Daphne Oram’s 1972 book ‘An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics’, co-published with the Daphne Oram Trust, continues unabated. Read more

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Anna Freeman Bentley: Exclusive – Paintings of Private Members Clubs

Foreword by Roberta Ahmanson; introduction by John Silvis; essay by Jane Neal
64pp, hardback, 315 x 250 mm, c. 40 images

In this publication, British artist Anna Freeman Bentley presents a series of new paintings and works on paper documenting her journey into the exclusive realm of private members clubs, and in particular to some of the most desirable clubs around Los Angeles. In places where photography is often strictly forbidden, Freeman Bentley had access to some of the many lounges, bars, and restaurants that are second homes to the members who pay considerable fees to use them. Freeman Bentley uses her photographs of these out-of-hours spaces as the starting point for unpeopled drawings, collages, and painted sketches, transforming her studies into complex paintings that hover between reality and invention. Read more

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Now available: Justin Mortimer – Hoax

Essay by Freya Cooper Kiddie
88pp, hardback, 255 x 195 mm, c. 45 images

Coinciding with a solo presentation of ‘The Hoax Suite’ by British painter Justin Mortimer at the 2018 edition of The Armory Show in New York, this publication presents 30 paintings depicting dead and dying flowers, offering not only an intense exposition of still life, but perhaps also one of the most significant series of paintings of flowers in our time. Read more

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Louise Giovanelli – In Conversation

Foreword by Paulette Terry Brien, essay and in-conversation by Charlotte Keenan McDonald
78pp + 8pp covers, paperback, 245 x 171.5 mm, c. 35 images

Louise Giovanelli (b.1993, London) is one of Britain’s most promising young painters. This, the artist’s first monograph, documents her first three solo exhibitions, staged in 2016-17 at The International 3, Salford, the Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool, and Touchstones Rochdale. Featuring a foreword by Paulette Terry Brien, co-founder and co-director of The International 3, Salford, UK, and an essay and an interview by Charlotte Keenan McDonald, Curator of British Art at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, this publication has been beautifully designed by Textbook Studio and published by Anomie in a first edition of 500 copies. Read more

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Richard Patterson – Matters of Life and Death

Introduction by Paul Moorhouse, essays by Jane Neal and James Cahill
104pp + 4pp covers, hardback in hard slipcase, 292 x 245 mm, c. 49 images

‘Matters of Life and Death’ is a limited-edition publication documenting the accomplished and haunting recent paintings of celebrated Dallas-based British artist Richard Patterson (b.1963). An engaging introduction by Paul Moorhouse, Senior Curator at the National Portrait Gallery, London, discusses the dynamic and complex relationship between figuration and abstraction in Patterson’s oeuvre. In his essay, art historian James Cahill explores the subjects of portraiture and personae within the artist’s works, while curator and critic Jane Neal navigates ideas of gender and sexuality in Patterson’s practice, taking us into the realms of fetish and the male gaze. Featuring a selection of works executed between 2013 and 2016, many of which are published here for the first time, the cloth-covered book is presented in a printed hard slipcase and published in an edition of just 500 copies. Read more

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Anomie’s autumn/winter 2016–17 brochure now available

Anomie Publishing’s autumn/winter 16–17 brochure is now out, featuring recent, new and forthcoming titles along with information about our backlist publications. Highlights include a brand new edition of British electronic music pioneer Daphne Oram’s 1972 book ‘An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics’, co-published with the Daphne Oram Trust, and a stunning clothbound hardback limited edition publication of the recent paintings of celebrated British artist Richard Patterson. Read more

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Daphne Oram – An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics

By Daphne Oram (first published in 1972), new introduction by Sarah Angliss
176pp + 4pp covers, hardback, 220 x 165 mm, c. 25 b/w images

Daphne Oram (1925–2003) was one of the central figures in the development of British experimental electronic music. Having declined a place at the Royal College of Music to become a music balancer at the BBC, she went on to become the co-founder and first director of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. In 1972, she authored her only book, ‘An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics’. At a time when the world was just starting to engage with electronic music and the technology was still primarily in the hands of music studios, universities and corporations, her approach was both innovative and inspiring, encouraging anyone with an interest in music to think about the nature, capabilities and possibilities that the new sounds could bring. ‘An Individual Note’ is a playful yet compelling manifesto for the dawn of electronic music and for our individual capacity to use, experience and enjoy it. Read more

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Oliver Clegg

Essay by Martin Herbert, interview with Sina Najafi
288pp + 4pp covers, hardback, 305 x 220 mm, c. 135 colour and b/w images

This is the first major monograph on the British-born, New York-based artist Oliver Clegg. An eclectic, polyphonic and multidisciplinary artist, Clegg’s oeuvre stretches from painting, drawing and printmaking to sculpture, installation, site-specific art, participatory projects and beyond. Indeed, his practice is in many ways a shining example of ‘post-medium’ creativity today, pursuing the essence of art itself beyond any specific medium or artform. The irony is, he’s pretty damn good with each artform too. Read more